Can You See Me Now?

December 6, 2017

Thinking about the topic of perceptions, it made me think about how easy it is for someone to put on a brave face so that people perceive them in a way that they want to come across. In some ways, we have to do this as doctors all the time. No matter what is going on in our personal lives, we always have to be kind, considerate, composed and empathetic when dealing with patients. Even if we don't feel like it on the inside. On the flip-side, patients can often do the same. When doctors ask how they are doing, they may act like they are fine, when actually, on the inside, they are broken and hurting. People do this all of the time - it is human nature to want to appear strong and in control, and it is hard to admit that we are struggling. I like to compare it to the response-etiquette to the frequently asked question when two individuals meet: "How are you?", in which 99.9% of the time is followed with "I'm very well thank you", or something along those lines. You could be having the worst day ever, but still find those words falling out of your mouth.

 

Along the same lines, I collaborated with a friend to produce a recording of a piece of spoken-word set to music. It was based on the idea of emotional abuse - something that is often hidden so deeply underneath a masquerade of a person's facade. The script was based on a fictional character, whom the world perceived as having a perfect life: with her picture-perfect family represented by her white-picket fence.

 

Words written by my anonymous talented friend, piano music written by myself, with a collaboration of our voice recordings.

 

 

 

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